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Wyoming Wild Horse Herds in Jeopardy 

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(Remember that rumor about “things will be different when Salazar leaves,” or the rumor that the BLM will follow the directives of the new study and leave the remaining horses alone? Remember how the BLM said they need to seek new answers because they have no more room to store horses? Must have all been a dream, for once again the BLM is off to zero out herd after herd. – Jerry)

KCSG.com September 7, 2013

images-6(ROCK SPRINGS, WY) – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) announced public meetings to be held in Rock Springs (Sept. 11) and Rawlins, WY (Sept. 12) to discuss removing all wild horses from the private and public lands of the Wyoming checkerboard.

“Press releases issued by the BLM have been confusing to say the least,” says Ginger Kathrens, Executive Director of The Cloud Foundation. Press releases dated August 16th and 27th state that BLM agreed to remove all wild horses from the Rock Spring Grazing Association’s (RSGA) private lands. However, the Federal Register Announcement clearly states the scoping notice is to consider the environmental effects of revising the Resource Management Plans (RMP’s) for the Rock Springs and Rawlins Field offices by considering managing the Salt Wells Creek (572 horses), the Great Divide Basin (439 horses) herds for zero wild horses, changing the Adobe Town (433 horses) herd’s Appropriate Management Level (AML) to 225 horses, and managing the White Mountain (205 horses) herd as a non-reproducing herd: eliminating 46% of the wild horses in Wyoming.

Under National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the BLM must consider:

• Environmental impacts;

• Any adverse environmental impacts should the proposal be implemented;

• The reasonable alternatives;

• The relationship between local short-term uses of man’s environment enhancement of long-term productivity;

• Irreversible and irretrievable commitments of resources involved in the proposed action should it be implemented.

The 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horse and Burro Act mandates, “The Secretary shall manage wild free-roaming horses and burros in a manner that is designed to achieve and maintain a thriving natural ecological balance on the public lands.”

“The removal of horses from three herd’s and the sterilization of horses in White Mountain will cause irreversible damage to the ongoing survival of wild horse herds in southern Wyoming, will adversely impact tourism, and will reduce the value of public lands by the loss of these symbols of freedom,” explains Kathrens. “This action violates the Wild Horse & Burro Act. If the BLM removes these horses, it not only violates the multiple use mandate for public lands but it would be managing the lands for the benefit of the Rock Springs Grazing Association, for monetary gain, instead of according to the original intent of Congress in creating the Act.”

Scoping meetings will provide an opportunity for the public to ask questions with BLM specialists and view maps and posters detailing the RMP revision process. Written comments may be submitted until Sept. 27. 

“It is our hope that there will be enough public outcry against this outrageous atrocity, that the BLM will consider a more positive approach involving on-the-range management as opposed to massive removals,” states Kathrens.

Meeting Location and times:

Sept. 11, 4-7 PM 

Rock Springs, WY 

Rock Springs Field Office 

280 Highway 191 N. 

Rock Springs, WY 

Sept. 12, 4-7 PM

Rawlins, WY

Rawlins Field Office

1300 N. Third St.

Rawlins, WY

For those unable to attend the meetings submit comments:

Email comments to RockSpringsRMP_WY@blm.gov 

(please include “Wild Horse Scoping” in the subject line), 

Fax (307) 352-0329 

Mail: Bureau of Land Management 

Rock Springs Field Office

Wild Horse Scoping

280 Highway 191 North

Rock Springs, WY 82901. 

 

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