Welcome to Habitat For Horses!|Saturday, September 20, 2014

Wild, wild horses — right in Moffat County’s back yard 

Nadja Rider
Sand Wash Basin photographers named this wild horse Tag. He's currently a bachelor stallion. He's one of the oldest stallions, and some believe he's 25 to 26 years old.

With approximately 400 acres per horse, there is enough room for these wild horses. Especially if birth control efforts are underway. Perhaps its the grazing permits that need to be restricted. A quick online search of the region will pull up ranch properties for sale that make promises of easy to get BLM grazing permits. Shouldn’t this type of welfare be given scrutiny and only allotted under special circumstances? Such as what a typical family struggling to make ends meet must go through to get food stamps – financial and other legal proof must be provided to gain food stamps. It should be even more difficult to garner those grazing permits since this is a private business trying to gain profit. ~ HfH

From: Craig Daily Press
By: Noelle Leavitt Riley

Wild horses hold a majestic, Wild West-like quality.

Nadja Rider Sand Wash Basin photographers named this wild horse Tag. He's currently a bachelor stallion. He's one of the oldest stallions, and some believe he's 25 to 26 years old.

Nadja Rider
Sand Wash Basin photographers named this wild horse Tag. He’s currently a bachelor stallion. He’s one of the oldest stallions, and some believe he’s 25 to 26 years old.

When most think about a wild horse, an open frontier with thousands of rolling acres in the Old West appears, a cowboy trying to tame an unruly beast or a Native American capturing an equine for its tribe comes to mind.

The amazing aspect of wild horses is that they still exist right here in Moffat County, giving spectators who visit their habitat at the Sand Wash Basin an opportunity to experience the heart of the American West.

To see the magnificent equines, all you have to do is take a short 45 minute drive west of Craig on U.S. Highway 40, turn right onto Moffat County Road 67 until you see the Sand Wash Basin sign.

If you’re lucky, you’ll see one — if not several — of the 406 wild horses that live on the 160,000 acres of property maintained by Bureau of Land Management. The horses are fascinating, colorful and simply breathtaking.

“They’re beautiful, they’re high in color and you can see them pretty easily,” said Wendy Reynolds, field manager at the BLM Little Snake Field office in Craig. “What makes it so unique is the markings and the colors of this particular herd.”

The Sand Wash Basin and its horses has become a huge tourism attraction for the county — an alluring treat for those who crave a taste of an untainted part of Colorado.

Foaling season and stallion fights

Spring is foaling season, making it a perfect time to see mares and their newborn horses roaming their natural surroundings in the high desert plains of Northwest Colorado.

The foals are small, fuzzy and sensational. Most who visit the Sand Wash Basin this time of year are able to see the young horses with their parents.

Continue Reading


Habitat for Horses recently lost 100 acres of grazing land needed to feed our rescued horses! Your help is desperately needed! Without this land we can not rescue other abused and neglected horses. Please donate today. Find out more by clicking here.