Welcome to Habitat For Horses!|Saturday, August 2, 2014
You are here: Home » breaking » The Wild Horses Of The Flint Hills (Video)

The Wild Horses Of The Flint Hills (Video) 

wild_horses_flint_hills

The media often prints misinformation about the wild horses of the American west. The travesty of using public lands by cattle for private gain is not brought up in this article.

On a different note – please remember to keep the pressure up to stop Donkey Basketball. Even if this event goes on today as it is scheduled to… make their 1st Annual Donkey Basketball event the LAST. Charlie Riley’s phone number is 281/330-9589, Magnolia Jr. High’s phone number is 281/356-1327 and be sure to post to the Seniors Friendship Center Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/tfcseniors who will be benefiting and acting as cheerleaders at this event ~ HfH

From: KMUW
By: Aileen LeBlanc

The wild horses of the west are being managed by the federal government with 71 million tax dollars. Some people believe that the herds are growing too large and that the horses are over populating the western public lands, taking up resources that could be used for cattle, wildlife and recreation use. But extra feral horses can’t be shot or slaughtered and few are adopted. So thousands are shipped to the Midwest for safekeeping on large ranches. KMUW’s Aileen LeBlanc visited a herd of wild mustangs in the Flint Hills near Cassoday.

wild_horses_flint_hills

It’s not hard to see in your mind the Indians that lived in these hills thousands of years ago – long before there were horses or white men. With the exception of a few widely spaced fences and one interstate which runs through it, the Flint Hills of Kansas carry their history right on the surface.

Continue Reading…there is also audio and really good pictures on the article.
 


Habitat for Horses is a 501.c.3 nonprofit equine protection organization supported solely by donations. We have around 200 donkeys and horses under our care, plus one ornery, old mule. Most of them are here because law enforcement removed them from their previous owner. Our ability to rehabilitate and rehome them comes from the financial support of people like you. Please support us by making a donation for the horses we all serve. Click HERE to donate