Welcome to Habitat For Horses!|Thursday, October 2, 2014

Texas City Officers and Habitat for Horses rescue 5 horses from stable 

Habitat for Horses Executive Director, Rebecca Williams, leads a horse to safety

Our most important mission here at Habitat for Horses is to rescue and rehabilitation. What the public may not know is: All rescues are done through law enforcement agencies. Then charges are filed under the direction of the courts that allow the animals to be removed. Before the seizure begins, everyone at the ranch is preparing for the seizure. How many horses?, their condition?, what are their medical needs?, vets need to be made aware and ready. Our rescue missions go across the state of Texas, and none of this is free. This is why we ask for donations. The dollars you donate go towards our goal of saving horses from abuse and death. We did that yesterday – These 5 horses now have a chance at a better life that they did not have before. ~ HfH

Officers rescue 5 horses from stable; 2 could not stand

From: Galveston Daily News
By T.J. Aulds and Christopher Smith Gonzalez

Habitat for Horses lead investigator Susan Moore assists veterinarian Dennis Jenkins as he administers intravenous fluids to a young palomino mare that was rescued Tuesday. Two of five horses seized in a West Texas City stable Tuesday were in very poor health were being cared for at the veterinary practice.

Habitat for Horses lead investigator Susan Moore assists veterinarian Dennis Jenkins as he administers intravenous fluids to a young palomino mare that was rescued Tuesday. Two of five horses seized in a West Texas City stable Tuesday were in very poor health were being cared for at the veterinary practice.

TEXAS CITY — Police launched an animal cruelty investigation after city animal control officers seized five abandoned horses from a stable in West Texas City on Tuesday. Two of the horses were in such poor shape they had to be carried out on sleds and taken to an equine veterinarian in Santa Fe.

Officer Randall Johnson, who manages Texas City’s animal control officers, said the two horses taken to the veterinarian were so malnourished they could not stand. The three other horses seized from the stable Tuesday were “severely malnourished” and were taken to the Habitat for Horses rescue organization’s facility in Hitchcock.

Johnson said someone called in a report of abandoned horses to Habitat for Horses. The organization in turn got in touch with Texas City police, who sent animal control officers to a stable in the 800 block of North Orchid near the Kohfeldt Park riding arena.

Habitat for Horses Executive Director, Rebecca Williams, leads a horse to safety

Habitat for Horses Executive Director, Rebecca Williams, leads a horse to safety

“We had to implement an emergency seizure the horses were in such bad shape,” Johnson said.
Johnson said the stable owner leased the space to someone else and was unaware of the deplorable conditions of the horses. The stable owner also leases stables to other horse owners.

The two sickest horses were taken to Santa Fe Equine Associates and were being treated by veterinarians Dr. Dennis W. Jenkins and Dr. Michelle C. Milton, Johnson said.

“They are extremely critical,” Milton said Tuesday night. “Their prognosis is grave to poor at this point.”

As it grew colder Tuesday night, Milton was trying to find more blankets for the horses to help bring their body temperatures up.

“The main thing tonight is going to be getting them warmer,” Milton said.

The horses each only weighed about 500 to 550 pounds but should weigh about 800 to 950 pounds and should each be about four inches taller, Milton said.

Jerry Finch, president and founder of Habitat for Horses, said the horses were likely only a 1 to 11⁄2 years old and their body temperature was only about 96 or 97 degrees, while a normal horse has a body temperature of 101.

Milton said she would be staying with the horses all night long and rolling them over every four to six hours to keep pressure on the nerves in the front and back legs.

She said ideally she would like to see them up within the next 24 hours but once a horse goes down, it can be very difficult to get them back up.

“Tonight is going to be critical,” Milton said.

Johnson said his officers have yet to confirm who owns the horses but said the horses are now the subject of an animal cruelty investigation.
 

Texas City horse rescue
Texas City horse rescue
rescue4
Texas City Horse Rescue

Continue to Original Article on Galveston Daily News


Habitat for Horses recently lost 100 acres of grazing land needed to feed our rescued horses! Your help is desperately needed! Without this land we can not rescue other abused and neglected horses. Please donate today. Find out more by clicking here.