Welcome to Habitat For Horses!|Thursday, December 18, 2014

Rural Utah will take wild horse fight to New Orleans, Washington 

Nevada wild horses

Do not think this means the wild horses will be reasonably dealt with. Beaver County Commissioner Mark Whitney states in the article that horses they deem to be in excess will be “disposed”. You know, like litter. This is how these pro-county types see wild horses. They are disposable. ~ HfH

From: Deseret News
By: Amy Joi O’Donoghue

Nevada wild horsesSALT LAKE CITY — Rural Utah leaders do not want a Cliven Bundy-style showdown with the Bureau of Land Management so they are rustling up allies and taking their fight to Washington, D.C., and New Orleans to put control of wild horses in the hands of the states.

“We don’t want this to turn out to be anything like the Cliven Bundy deal. Just because the BLM can break the law does not mean we can break the law,” said Beaver County Commissioner Mark Whitney. “Two wrongs don’t make a right. … We are trying to take the high road on this.”

Whitney said they want to avoid an armed showdown with the agency like this past April in Nevada, where Bundy ignored court orders to remove his cattle or pay grazing fees.

With that in mind, Beaver and Iron counties have backed off their threats to round up excess wild horses from the southern Utah range officials assert has been denuded of vegetation. Instead, Whitney and Iron County Commissioner Dave Miller floated and got unanimous approval of a resolution that takes their fight to the National Association of Counties meeting later this month in New Orleans.

Members of the Utah Association of Counties endorsed a resolution that calls for the management of wild horse and burro populations be turned over to the states. That same resolution will come up for possible action at the national level.

“The BLM does not have the right or the setup to be in wild horse management,” Whitney said. “Those animals need to be turned over to be managed by the state Division of Wildlife Resources just like any other animal — and that includes managing them to appropriate management levels and for disposal.”

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