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Navajo Veteran Wants to Heal Others With Wild Horses 

larrisonmanygoats

This article is still worth while even with the misinformation about how wild horses effect the environment. Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy will be offered here at Habitat for Horses. Habitat for Horse’s upcoming newsletter will feature an article on this program. It is good to see these types of therapy used throughout our country. To receive our newsletter, click through to the article on our website, the sign up form is on the upper right side of the article page. ~ HfH

From: Epoch Times
By: Conan Milner

larrisonmanygoatsWhen U.S. marine Larrison Manygoats returned from his tours of duty in Iraq, he was diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injuries (TBI). Recovery was a struggle, until a friend recommended a project with the Mustang Heritage Foundation, an organization that uses wild horses to help veterans overcome war trauma.

According to Manygoats, horse therapy can address severe trauma in ways that pills and talk therapy can’t touch.

“Working with the horse pulls these things out of you, emotionally, physically, to make you see that there is an exit, there is something out there that makes you want to do better, to strive, to be open minded. It gives hope,” he said.

Inspired by his own healing experience, Manygoats wants to help other veterans living in his community on the Navajo reservation near the town of Tuba, in northern Arizona.

With the help of his father and a handful of volunteers, Manygoats recently finished building a basic facility on some unused land on the reservation, which he calls a reconditioning center.

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Habitat for Horses is a 501.c.3 nonprofit equine protection organization supported solely by donations. We have around 200 donkeys and horses under our care, plus one ornery, old mule. Most of them are here because law enforcement removed them from their previous owner. Our ability to rehabilitate and rehome them comes from the financial support of people like you. Please support us by making a donation for the horses we all serve. Click HERE to donate