Welcome to Habitat For Horses!|Monday, November 24, 2014

Horse virus spreads through Central Texas (Video) 

flies on a horse

Cases of Vesicular Stomatitis are still growing here in Texas. Keeping the fly population down and a look out for any of the symptoms is the best thing you can do for your horses. This painful disease must be brought under control. And be careful – there are some types of VS that give humans flu like symptoms. ~ HfH

From: KEYE TV

flies on a horse

Flies can easily spread Vesicular Stomatitis.

A painful horse virus is spreading through Central Texas causing quarantines and canceling shows. Today, the Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) is confirming at least eight new cases in Bastrop and Travis County.

Beverly Manroe is training riders in North Austin for the next horse show, but she’s worried a highly-contagious virus could infect her plans. “If a facility is quarantined, that say might’ve brought ten horses to my show, that’s a significant economic hit,” said Manroe.

Since May 28, the TAHC has quarantined at least 21 locations in eight Texas counties because of Vesicular Stomatitis (VS).

“Did not really think it was that big of a deal until everyone started talking,” said horse trainer, Si Jarboe. Manroe says it kept two horses from competing in her show at the Travis County Expo Center last week. “Because we’re not familiar with the disease, people get a little hysterical,” said Manroe.

VS is a virus that can cause lesions and sloughing of the skin from the hooves to the muzzle affecting the mouth and tongue.

“It transmits so easily,” said Jarboe. “The flies are what I understand are the transmitter.”

“It’s bad.” Rusty Edwards who owns a ranch near Bastrop says he’s not taking any chances.

“We have 45 head here and I’m responsible for every horse on this place,” said Edwards. “I don’t want any of them sick, so we shut the place down.”

After talking to his veterinarian, he canceled his playday series for Saturday, June 26. It’s a financial loss for his business. “Yea. It hurts. Sure,” said Edwards.

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