Welcome to Habitat For Horses!|Thursday, August 21, 2014
You are here: Home » breaking » Cody-based group advocates for better water for horses

Cody-based group advocates for better water for horses 

Photo by Ryan Dorgan
Dry Creek snakes through the 110,000 acres of BLM land outside Cody, downstream from Marathon Oil drilling operations in the Oregon Basin.

Reading the rest of the article will give you a bit of insight into how oil and energy companies operations are effecting the water tables in regions where a wide variety of wild life live, including wild horses. It seems to be human nature to always look to short term solutions and never how our actions effect the world around us. ~ HfH

From: Star Tribune
By: Ryan Dorgan

Photo by Ryan Dorgan Dry Creek snakes through the 110,000 acres of BLM land outside Cody, downstream from Marathon Oil drilling operations in the Oregon Basin.

Photo by Ryan Dorgan
Dry Creek snakes through the 110,000 acres of BLM land outside Cody, downstream from Marathon Oil drilling operations in the Oregon Basin.

CODY — A black mustang shook its nose while lumbering along the edge of a fence outside town.

Ada Inbody, 76, pulled her truck to a stop on the side of the highway when she saw it.

“I think that may be Tucson,” Inbody said Tuesday. “I need to see his face.”

Inbody twisted around in the driver’s seat and saw the white star on the horse’s nose. It was Tuscon, a stud she named on one of her hundreds of days spent among the horses. A swarm of stinging nose flies had flown into his nostrils.

“They drive him crazy,” Inbody said of the insects, shifting her truck back into gear. “Bless his heart.”

Inbody is one of several members of Friends of a Legacy, or FOAL, a Cody-based advocacy group fighting for better water for Tucson and the 150 other wild horses living on federal land between Cody and Powell.

The only water source in the area is a creek downstream from several major Marathon Oil fields.

For years, produced water from the fields — suitable for animals but not humans, Inbody said — has sustained the wild horse herd. Recent regulation changes limited the amount of contaminated water Marathon could send down the stream, causing water levels in the creek to drop and FOAL to form.

Now, the group hopes to help Marathon and the Bureau of Land Management construct a series of pipelines for water on the land.

Continue Reading

 


Habitat for Horses is a 501.c.3 nonprofit equine protection organization supported solely by donations. We have around 200 donkeys and horses under our care, plus one ornery, old mule. Most of them are here because law enforcement removed them from their previous owner. Our ability to rehabilitate and rehome them comes from the financial support of people like you. Please support us by making a donation for the horses we all serve. Click HERE to donate