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BLM criticized for selling Wyoming horses for slaughter 

Wild horses roam the Jack Morrow Hills area of the Red Desert in Sweetwater County. The Bureau of Land Management has been criticized for selling a herd of Wyoming horses to a Canadian slaughterhouse. The BLM said the horses were legally considered stray, not wild, and therefore not subject to federal wild horse protections.

What opponents to the wild horses and the BLM does not say is how hush-hush they kept this operation. Yes, they posted what they were doing…but quietly. The BLM knew The Cloud Foundation and other organizations are more than willing to take in 41 horses if slaughter was the only alternative. Yet, these organizations were never sought. Instead for less than $1700 these horses were sold to slaughter. Shocking. ~ HfH

From: Trib.com
By: Mead Gruver AP

The Bureau of Land Management rounded up a horse herd that had roamed for decades on federal land in northwest Wyoming and handed the horses over to Wyoming officials.

Wild horses roam the Jack Morrow Hills area of the Red Desert in Sweetwater County. The Bureau of Land Management has been criticized for selling a herd of Wyoming horses to a Canadian slaughterhouse. The BLM said the horses were legally considered stray, not wild, and therefore not subject to federal wild horse protections.

Wild horses roam the Jack Morrow Hills area of the Red Desert in Sweetwater County. The Bureau of Land Management has been criticized for selling a herd of Wyoming horses to a Canadian slaughterhouse. The BLM said the horses were legally considered stray, not wild, and therefore not subject to federal wild horse protections.

They, in turn, sold the herd to the highest bidder, a Canadian slaughterhouse.

Wild horse advocates are incensed, saying they should have had a chance to intercede in the March roundup and auction. But the BLM says that the horses were abandoned, not wild, and that it publicized the sale beforehand.

“It would take very little to do this in a more effective way so that horses are not just sent off to slaughter indiscriminately,” said Paula Todd King, of The Cloud Foundation, a Colorado-based advocacy group.

According to the BLM, the Wyoming horses weren’t officially wild and protected by the Wild-Free Roaming Horses and Burro Act, the federal law for maintaining many of the horse herds, some of which have roamed free in the West since the days of Spanish explorers more than 300 years ago.

The BLM bans wild horses from being sold for slaughter. Anybody who adopts a wild horse from the BLM must agree to provide it a home.

The horses in the Bighorn Basin’s sagebrush hills descended from stray rodeo horses owned by Andy Gifford, a rancher and rodeo livestock contractor, in the 1970s, BLM spokeswoman Sarah Beckwith said.

Gifford had claimed the horses as his but never rounded them up before he died in 2009. That, plus the fact that the horses never interbred with wild horses, officially classified them as strays.

“Nobody had a permit to have these horses grazing on public lands,” Beckwith said.

King questions that policy. “How long does a horse have to live wild and free before it’s considered wild?” she said.

Area ranchers and farmers had long complained that the herd grazed down pastures and damaged cattle rangeland.

On March 18 and March 19, a BLM contractor rounded up the 41 horses and handed them over to Wyoming officials. Within hours, the horses were sold for $1,640 to Bouvry Exports, a slaughterhouse based in Calgary, Alberta.

The BLM follows state laws for handling stray livestock, Beckwith said, and it had no option but to hand over the horses to the Wyoming Livestock Board. The state took three bids for the horses, state Brand Commissioner Lee Romsa said.

Bouvry Exports shipped the horses out of state, Romsa said. Phone messages for Bouvry Exports weren’t immediately returned.

BLM officials had printed notices about the upcoming roundup in local newspapers and posted notices in local post offices.

The roundup wasn’t unprecedented. Last summer, a federal judge allowed an American Indian tribe to sell 149 mustangs over the objection of critics, who claimed that the unbranded animals were federally protected wild horses.

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